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Showing posts with label lunch. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lunch. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

A True Room 39 Post

Last time I was at Room 39, I was actually bumming their internet to finish up a few writing assignments, as well as some work stuff. This time, I'm here because they were just too gosh-darn accommodating and nice about the whole thing that I just had to come back. Their Foursquare hinted towards the Oven eggs, so I just had to give them a go. Plus, they have Harney  & Sons tea...and we all know I'm a sucker for Earl Gray.

Room 39 on UrbanspoonThe tea is served with steamed milk, which comes in a proper little stainless steel kettle. The tea cup is more of a mug, which is mismatched with the saucer, but only a really anal prick like me would ever truly notice. The tea is even served with an adorable little demitasse spoon, which is usually reserved for espresso and coffee drinks.  The tea already comes in the mug, however, with the tea bag, so you can't do the "proper English way" of scalding the milk with the hot tea, which changes the flavor...but one would argue that with steamed milk it doesn't matter. Which it kind of doesn't, really. But, hey, today you learned something about the 'proper English way of tea', didn't you? The thing that matters is that they know what they're doing.

Let's talk about the ambiance. We have "exposed brick" wall on the left, which appears to be genuine-ish, and we also have exposed vents, a historical-esque ceiling with chipping paint...and warm, European-style flooring and bistro tables and chairs. A few of the chairs are chipped on the backs or the leggs, but that only seems to add to everything. They were going for Euro-bistro, and they got it.

The entrance is a curtained-in area to brush away the bitter Kansas City cold, and lots of flyers from the local area are left there for comers or go-ers. On the walls are, what appear to be, vintage prints and paintings by a local artist, all priced accordingly. Many Westport/39th street area restaurants advertise with their local artists on consignment deals, which is mutually beneficial to both parties. (Not only do you get low-cost artwork for your walls, but you get to help the community out.

The servers I've had each time I come here are lovely pixies with black dresses, stockings, and one has tattoos. (The one with tattoos also has the most-adorable dimples I've ever seen.) They're knowledgeable, friendly, and casually well-mannered. They're relaxed; they don't hover over you, which is amazing. But they did remember me, so that's a good feeling.

The oven eggs were completely delicious, and super-filling. The fruit was fresh and melded well. The gruyere was cheesey, the salami was salty...an overall tasty dish, impressive in its simplicity. I can see how they would go well with truffle oil, but I honestly don't care for the stuff, myself. I know, I know, I should pass my Chef-card forward...but, darnit, I can't put truffle oil on eggs. Potatoes? Sure. Asparagus? Why not. Eggs? No, thanks. I'm a purist.

All in all? Not bad at all. I enjoyed the food, the wait staff was very friendly, the wifi is fast, and the atmosphere is pretty cool. I think it's the perfect 'dining alone' experience. I don't know if I'd want to come here with another person, necessarily, but I wouldn't not want to come with another person.

The place is satisfying in and of itself. It makes me feel like it could be a tiny little bistro somewhere in Marseille, or something. It's chill. And the food is good. It's a good, little bistro. So I'll be back. Maybe with another person. But I'm comfortable dining alone, here, so that will always be a good sign.

And someone should check out the Room 39 in Leawood, so I can know what it was like without taking the trek all the way down there. I mean, seriously, this is right down the street from my house.

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Ginger Sue's is AMAZING

It's very unassuming on the outside. No, really. If you didn't know what you were looking for you would probably pass it without even knowing what had happened. It's such a little door - probably to hold in all the flavors, just like Wonka's chocolate factory - and it opens to such a possibility.

You're first greeted with a warm palette of colors, warm autumnal reds with yellow, browns and golds. It's not lavish. It's meant to look like a beautiful Southwestern/Creole kitchen. In its simplicity of design, you feel like you've stumbled upon something special. A. and I were seated by a friendly brunette waitress, which seemed to be one of many. (Seriously, there were a lot of pretty little brunettes that were there that day.) The coffee was fresh, which was a good sign, and the staff was very friendly and engaging. None of that glazed-over dead-in-the-eye stuff of so many people I've seen here. It was refreshing.

The menu seemed heavily influenced by Cajun/Creole ingredients. Everything from Cajun crepes to andouille sausage pasta specials, from breakfast to lunch of tenderloin or pancakes. They had french toast and eggs benedict. I personally couldn't resist the call of the hollandaise sauce, I settled for the crab benedict, rather than the salmon benedict(which almost got me,  had I not had so much dang smoked salmon in Garde Manger class lately). Classical French meets Cajun/Creole meets America. That's a wonderful description of their cuisine, I think.

A. got the tenderloin, which was breaded very nicely and served on a rather large plate of veggie accompaniments as well as a tasty apple-peppers slaw. It was moist and thin, and didn't give that normally heavy feeling that many tenderloins sometimes give. You know, the kind where you know you've eaten too much bread and you can do nothing about it?

The crab benedict was great. The eggs were poached perfectly and the hollandaise sauce, although just a touch under-seasoned, balanced out the homefried potatoes that came with it. Good toast on the English muffin, good amount of crab vs. egg...all in all, it was a successful and creative dish. Both A. and I were stuffed when the waitress asked if we'd have pumpkin pie for dessert. I couldn't resist, but I couldn't speak - fortunately, I have the most wonderful boyfriend in the world who suggested that we split it.

Ginger Sue's on UrbanspoonAll of their pies and desserts are made in-House, which is always admirable. The crust was nice and tender, and the custard of the pumpkin pie itself was nice and spicy with that same smoothness that we all desire in a custard pie. The real trick to custard pies is low heat with a long and slow cooking time. You can tell that a lot of love went into this pie, and it showed. Ginger Sue's is easily my new favorite breakfast place in historic downtown Liberty, MO and you'll be sure to see me back there for the rest of the menu sometime soon. If you'd like to check out more of their info, go to UrbanSpoon. 90% of people who have been there love it.  No need to be shocked.