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Showing posts with label breakfast. Show all posts
Showing posts with label breakfast. Show all posts

Sunday, March 29, 2020

Souffle Pancakes


Souffle Pancakes 
  • 35 g cake flour
  • 20 g oat milk (or dairy milk, whatever)
  • 2 g baking powder
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 45 g sugar + a pinch 
First thing's first: heat your griddle on a medium flame. I have a cast-iron griddle, but that doesn't mean I don't need to give it a quick wipe with olive oil or shortening. These are incredibly fiddly, so a thin layer of fat will go a long way. If you don't have a griddle, you can use a nonstick pan, so long as it's large and rather flat. 

Next, set up a piping bag by cutting off the tip and standing it up in a tall measuring cup or large tumbler. Fold the edge over the lip of the cup to keep it steady. This is a good trick to have in your arsenal for buttercreams, as well!



Separate the eggs and whisk a pinch of sugar in with the milk and yolks in a medium bowl, while your egg whites and 45 g of sugar go into the bowl of a standing mixer. You can add a splash of vanilla paste or rum extract at this point, too, if you like. Whisk by hand to make sure it's quite frothy. If you have a sieve of some sort, I'd advise using this to fold in the dry ingredients to your yolk-milk mixture. If you don't, it's honestly fine if you simply whisk them in, so long as you use smaller increments. 

Whisk your egg whites for 30 seconds on low to dissolve the sugar. Turn up your whisk to medium until frothy, and then whip on high until you get quite stiff peaks. Add in a small dollop of your whipped meringue to the egg yolk mixture and stir in using the whisk. It's not important to necessarily preserve bubbles, but to just stir it in to get everything slightly lighter. Add in a larger dollop of meringue - about a third of the whites - and fold in gently using the whisk. You're going to repeat this process until you get to the last third of the whites, at which point you'll switch to using the spatula.

Once everything's folded in together, your griddle should be hot. Turn it down to the lowest flame possible. Did you remember to give a quick glaze with the fat of your choice? Did you find yourself the thinnest spatula you could? Oh, good, I'm so glad you did. Now that you've ticked that box, you may gently pour your pancake batter into your prepared piping bag.

Wok not included.

Pipe large mounds of pancake, as if you were creating a rounded mountain of fluff, a few centimeters apart, all on your now-hot griddle. Do leave some space between them as it'll make flipping that much easier. Now, go wash your hands with hot water and soap, as hot as you can stand it. Rinse well, and rinse again with cold water. Let your dripping wet hands, that are now gone of all soap residue, and splash a few droplets of water around each pancake to create some steam. Now set the timer on the oven (or on your phone) for 6 minutes.  If you didn't use up all of your batter in this go, turn on your oven to 200 degrees and put a couple of ceramic plates in there. These will hold your cakes until you're ready to eat.

I'm sure you, like I, are quarantined so you're likely going stir-crazy already. Shall I entertain you for six minutes? I'll do my best by telling you a fun few facts about things you can use to stretch your budget - or, rather, stretch the life of your goods already in your house so you needn't venture out.

Switch to loose-leaf tea. This may seem counterproductive, but trust me on this one - it's going to be a budget-saver. If you switch to loose-leaf tea, you can brew up to ten pots from the same leaves. No, seriously. Ten. All you do is introduce boiling water after each pot is drained and let steep a minute longer than usual. Black teas, for example, should be brought back to life with boiling water, and steeped for 4 minutes. On the second, third, and fourth brews? Just five minutes with boiling water will do. Once your tea leaves are all said and done, don't you dare throw them away. My favorite use is to wrap the leaves in a paper towel and use them to scrub the counters, especially around the corners and around the sink; this is especially a good tip if you have issues with ants. I've had good success with keeping ants away using this, and that's not the only thing. If you drop them in the toilet bowl and let them sit for a few hours in the water, give it a quick brush, and flush for a deodorizing and stain-lifting treatment without harsh chemicals. If you have a musty carpet situation, let the tea leaves dry again, crush them up and sprinkle them on the carpet and let sit for 10 minutes or so before vacuuming. You can use those leftover leaves to feed your house plants, especially acid-loving plants such as ferns or orchids.  

Keep those egg shells. Let them dry out and crush with your hands. Use them with a scotch-brite pad and a drop of castille soap to scrub off any scummy such grossness on your sink. You can also use them as a super-rough scour for your cast-iron. I highly suggest not throwing away egg shells anyhow, especially if you have a garden. Everyone knows you can use them for fertilizer, but did you know that it helps feed birds in the spring? They just laid their eggs, and they usually will eat their egg shells to help get calcium back. Finally, if you crunch them up and sprinkle them around garden plots, it'll help keep pesky neighborhood cats and squirrels away. They don't like the sharp bits! Isn't that fun?

Beep beep! That timer should go off any second now! Flip them gently, I say, using that thin spatula of yours and - I cannot stress this part enough - ever so gently press the pancake into the hot surface of the griddle to make a flat-ish surface. Sprinkle on some water for steam. Time to sit and read for another 6 minutes? Oh, if you insist. 

Save your vegetable scraps - except the brassicas. This means broccoli and cauliflower, and any cabbage...unless you want that in your stock. Yes, you're making stock! Carrot peels, onion skins, lemon skins, herb branches, celery tips, ginger skins...anything you're likely using that's got big flavor. When you're ready to make that stock of yours, I'd like to suggest that you should also add in a cinnamon stick, some whole peppercorns, and a couple of bay leaves. Simply bring to a boil, and then simmer this goodness for one hour. Strain through a fine-mesh strainer and either freeze in jars or in an ice cube tray. You don't need new mason jars, by the way. Simply wash any glass jar that has a screw-top lid (salsa jar, lard jar, whatever) either in the dishwasher or with soap and water, and boil both lid and jar in water to sterilize. If you do add this stuff into a jar, make sure you leave room for the stock to expand while freezing, so don't fill it absolutely to the brim. Most restaurants make things taste amazing using homemade stocks, and you don't have to be left behind by that. The way restaurants make everything taste amazing is by punching in as much flavor as possible into one dish, and then making sure that everything is harmonious. 

If you want to take up your remaining time on that timer to find a clean, large container to let hang out in the fridge that'll catch all of your veggie scraps and set it in the bottom of the fridge, go right ahead. 

Your timer should be done! If you need to make more, carefully transfer each pancake onto those warming ceramic plates in your warm oven, and repeat the process. If you need another project to occupy you for two 6-minute increments, check out what the local artists in my town are doing to fight the misery of this quarantine here! This is an adult coloring book made by the Kansas City Art Scene. Check it out! If you don't need it, however, go ahead and turn off your burner and let hang out while you get plates. I don't think you need butter for this, but please make sure it's already near-melted as you don't want cold butter spreading on these delicate babies. I personally think they did fine with just maple syrup. By the way, did you know that you can make syrup from the trees you probably have in your backyard? Yes, you can make syrups other than maple! Birch trees are common, as are sycmore trees in this area. Check out this video on how to make birch syrup while you eat.  Or, you know, watch it while you wait for your second batch of pancakes to cook.






Thanks so much for reading! I hope you wake up tomorrow, inspired, to make these for breakfast. I also hope that you make these souffle pancakes for dinner tonight. Why shouldn't you have pancakes for dinner? We're all in the middle of redefining what we think the rules should really be right now, so why not you? Have pancakes for dinner! Give yourselves a little joy and silliness because goodness knows you need a good laugh. A dear friend of mine told me recently that it is a radical thing to take care of oneself in times like these.

I hope these turn out! Happy cooking and happy eating!


Sunday, August 12, 2018

Easy Potato Latkes

You can practically hear the sizzle, can't you?
I go to the Brookside farmer's market every Saturday during market season and always get produce from my favorite vendors is Urbavore Urban Farms, run by Brooke Salvaggio, who has become a friend. In the early seasons she has plants as well as produce, but she always has something that I want to buy, usually the eggs from the heritage breed chickens. That being said, I'm a big fan of the later season, when potatoes come up.

While only 200 different varieties of the noble potato grows in Northern America(yes, I did say 'only'), over 4,000 different varieties grow in Bolivia. Potatoes, like tomatoes, pumpkins, avocados, coffee, and chocolate, are an American crop. Why? Because they originate in South/Central America!

Image result for hot tea
This tea is BOMB
Yes, yes, you hear about the miracle crop being tied to Ireland all the time, but a little digging in the world of culinary anthropology will tell you that potatoes originate right here in the Americas. Pumpkins, corn, tomatoes, coffee, and chocolate - yes, chocolate, are categorized under all-American treats. In fact, the only reason that Italy has tomatoes, and therefore marinara sauce, is because of its expeditions to the Americas.

I'm sure that there are some among us that would like to believe that America itself was cultivated from all over the world, but the truth is that they had their own culture and unique biodiversity before Europeans came to colonize and spread syphilis and smallpox and introduce slave labor to the indigenous peoples. But I digress, this blog is not about tea.

This is about potatoes, and specifically the brand/breed of potato called purple viking. Yes, potatoes have different breeds. We've established this, please keep up.

It kind of looks like a dinosaur egg, don't you think?
This is a purple viking potato. It can grow to be nice and large, and has a creamy white flesh. I love the color, of course, and am always a big fan of unusual things. Did you know that the best way to  be healthy is to have a diverse diet? This doesn't always mean entirely different things every day - sometimes it's just trying a different variety of a vegetable/root you already love! Do you love orange carrots? Try white ones, roasted. Try purple ones, steamed. Eat the entire rainbow without every changing around.

Generally, potatoes can be set into two categories: starchy and waxy. A starchy potato, such as a classic Idaho/baking potato, will have a thick skin and will go a sort of pinkish brown if peeled and left out. They're high in starch but quite low in moisture, and are rather fluffy when cooked.

The starchy potatoes are considered to be the best for making french fries and - by some schools - mashed potatoes. The trouble, though, is that from starch comes glue if over-agitated, which is why sometimes your mashed potatoes might go gloopy if you stir them too much. The skin on said starchy potatoes, as well, are best for doing twice-baked potatoes and, in general, being vessels for other things. They don't exactly hold their shape well, however, so it's best if you do not use them for gratins, casseroles, or potato salads. For some reason, however, they're considered to be a classic for latkes by many.

The waxy potato is it's thinned-skined brethren, which are very low in starch and generally hold their shape quite well when cooked. When it comes to nearly every application, I'll take a waxy over a starchy any day of the week. I think that they're much more versatile, and I can whip the ever-living bejeezus out of them when making mashed potatoes and they won't go gloopy unless I screw something up. They're suitable in gratins, fries, and - of course - latkes.

See? CREAMY white flesh!
There are many schools of thought when it comes to these classic Ashkenazi potato fritter, and some will swear that a starchy potato is the best. I assume that this is because it's the tradition, but I find that this isn't true.

When you grate the potatoes, you must soak and rinse them to get rid of as much starch as possible, otherwise the latke will go gloopy. Now, why in the world would I start with an already-starchy product that might not hold its shape so well were I to use a not-so-starchy product in its stead? I tell you, dear reader, that I wouldn't, especially because the purple viking potato only needs one good rinse to get rid of the starch versus the four or five that your standard Russett or Idaho might need.

Many say you can grate in lots of other flavors into the potato - and you can! You can grate in half an onion, some garlic, plenty of herbs, and more. This is your latke and you can decide what to do with it. Yes, it was created by the Ashkenazi peoples (or so I'm told) but everybody can agree that these are delicious and that deep-fried potatoes can and should be for everyone. I like to use a 2:1 ratio if I'm adding in white onion to the fritter. Say, I do two large purple viking potatoes and one medium white onion with just a touch of salt and pepper - delicious! But this is the basic recipe, so just do what you like after you've tried this one.

Nowadays, you would mostly eat this around Hanukkah and serve it with apple sauce and/or sour cream. I like them with breakfast, any day of the week. Sue me.

Easy Latkes
yields 6 fritters
  • 1 large Purple Viking potato
  • 1 egg
  • A touch of salt
  • Neutral oil to fry in, such as canola or grapeseed 
Grate the potatoes using the largest side of your box grater and pop them into a mesh strainer. Rinse them quite thoroughly until the water runs clear, and then ring out the water in small handfuls to get them as dry as you can. Pop these in a medium bowl and season generously. Crack in one fresh egg and mix well, breaking up the yolk and white and coating absolutely everything in that bowl. As mentioned previously, you can add fresh herbs to this - I like parsley and dill, personally, but that's me.

Heat a thick yet shallow skillet with about an inch of oil to medium-high heat. Test the heat by dropping in one or two shreds of the egg-potato mixture. If it floats and sizzles, you're good to go. 

Gently lay in heaping spoonfuls of the latke mixture into your oil and press gently down in the middle to create a flat pancake. Swirl it carefully to just make sure that it didn't stick to the bottom, and then add in another. I can fit up to three latkes at a time in my pan, but don't you overload your oil because it lowers the temperature. 


Protip: You want the oil to be rather hot because things only get greasy when the oil is too cold and the oil seeps in. If it's hot enough, the water on the inside of the item you're frying will turn to steam and create a barrier for the oil to not get into, kind of like it when the footballers of the sportsball team do that head-butt thing at the beginning of the plays. 

Flip them gently with a fork or a pair of chopsticks, taking care not to splash yourself wit hot oil, and cook on the other side. The entire process shouldn't take more than two minutes in total, and the finished latkes can hold in a warm oven while you cook the rest. 

Please also make sure that you save the fat in a jar or a metal can and allow to cool before disposing of. Please don't throw it outside as it's bad for your homestead/garden, and please don't dump it down the drain. You can strain it and reuse it once or twice, but you can just pitch it in your can safely in a garbage bag once it's all used up. 



Serve these with breakfast, lunch or dinner! Latkes are truly a diverse food item and I encourage you to try them using all potatoes. (Just maybe not all at once.) Please also be sure to make an effort to get down to the farmer's market! This is, of course, to get better food, but it's also to get to know your growers. I'm going to let you in on a little secret...

The people that are making an effort against big chain grocery stores and taking food back to basics are the people you want to have a conversation with. Ask them questions, have them tell you the story of that crop. Connection with your fellow human is what the world needs right now, and the fellowship over food is truly what can unite us, instead of divide us.

Here in America, we are dealing with political turmoil unlike any in recent memory. If I have any international readers, I want them to know that we all want this to end, and that we are not horrible bigots. We Americans are loving and welcoming and we believe that immigrants make America great. As someone who's worked in the culinary industry her entire professional life, you would be starving were it not for immigrants and migrant workers. They cook your food, they harvest your crops, they do all of the hard jobs that you don't want to do, often with a smile. I welcome the immigrants and I want them to know that I'm an ally. I am an American, and hatred has no home in my backyard.

Happy cooking and happy eating! 

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Vegan Banana Pancakes

Surprise, bitch. Thought you'd seen the last of the #MUGLIFE mug.
Everything I cook at home for B and myself is dairy-free. He's got an extreme intolerance to any sort of dairy, and I'm Asian, which means I'm (generally) mildly lactose intolerant. Did you know that 90%-100% of East Asian people are lactose intolerant? I'm only half-Asian, though, so I guess that's 50% for me. I, thankfully, don't get extreme discomfort when I consume dairy products, but it does make me farty, which is definitely unpleasant for all.

Breakfast is the most-important meal of the day, and it can be sometimes difficult to make things dairy-free or vegan, especially when you think about fluffy pancakes. I don't often eat vegan food, but I do know how to substitute for eggs, should the need arise. This morning, for example, I did have eggs in the fridge, but I also had a bunch of overripe bananas, which are a perfect substitute for making yummy vegan pancakes. Here's how to make mine, without dirtying a single bowl:

Vegan Banana Pancakes

  • 5 ounces(by weight) AP flour
  • 1 oz baking powder
  • 7 oz coconut milk(almond-coconut milk blend works, too!)
  • 1 medium-sized, overripe banana
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 1 oz grapeseed oil(canola or olive work fine, too)
In the pitcher of a blender, weigh out all of your ingredients and blend until wholly combined and very smooth, about 30 seconds Scrape down the sides and up the bottom, and blitz again for about 5 more seconds. Heat a nonstick skillet on medium heat, just until hot, and then turn the gas down to low to simply maintain the heat. Turn your oven to 200 degrees, and place a ceramic or glass dish or pie tin in the oven for holding. Save the banana peels for your garden to help give some well-needed nutrients!

For the pancakes, simply pour out of the pitcher and let cook until the bubbles keep their shape. Flip, and cook for another minute or two, then pop in the oven to hold. This makes a nice batch of 8 pancakes, which is perfect for 3-4 people. If it's only you, simply make all of the cakes and freeze the rest for a quick microwaveable breakfast. 

"WHAT? YOU CAN'T MICROWAVE PANCAKES, YOU IGNORANT COW" - my cat, probably
No, really! Individually wrap each with plastic and freeze. You can heat them in the toaster or 30 - 45 seconds in the microwave for an on-the-go breakfast. You can also make jam sandwiches with the frozen-reheated ones for a really on-the-go breakfast!


Or, you know, enjoy with maple syrup. Whatever.

"THIS ISN'T LASAGNA YOU PIECE OF SHIT" - Also my cat, probably
Happy cooking and happy eating! Be sure to check out the WannaBGourmande Facebook page for more content between posts, and follow me on Twitter for more.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Russian Egg Volcanoes

On my Facebook page for WannaBGourmande, I posted a video(I think Russian in origin) of an egg dish I had never seen before! I had a little bit of time before work, so I did my own version of it. And by that, I mean followed the video to the letter. (So to speak...)

Fluffy Russian Egg Breakfast Thing

  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 2 slices of bacon
  • 2 slices of toast
  • butter, salt, and pepper as needed
Preheat your oven to 450 degrees F. Heat a pan and cook the bacon over medium-high heat. While that's going, whip the egg whites to a stiff peak. Since you used 2 eggs, just divide the fully whipped mixture in half when putting it in the pan. Drain all but 2 tsp of the bacon fat from your pan, and set the bacon aside to hang out. Plop the 'meringue' mixture into two snowy mountain-looking things in the pan. Gently let the egg yolks slide into the meringue. Pop the whole thing in the screaming-hot oven for about 4 minutes, or until everything has browned/crisped up just enough. 

Butter your toast, arrange your bacon on the plate, and when the fluffy egg volcanoes are done, they'll come right out of the pan quite easily using a rubber spatula.

To tell you the truth, it wasn't my absolute favorite, but it was still pretty good! It was fun. It was fluffy and light, and kind of reminded me of a souffle/frittatta kind of thing. I could have probably let it cook less, but I wanted to make sure that the egg whites were cooked. It honestly could have gone fine for 2 minutes, since my oven gets really hot really quickly. But the yolks were warm and still runny, so what more could I ask for?

I hope this encourages you to try new things. And check out the original video here

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Garden Omelette



There's nothing like a good omelet in the morning. Fluffy egg, yummy veggies, meats and cheeses (if you like)... Delicious stuff!

My favorite thing about omelette is that you can make a lot of them in a very very very small amount of time. Julia Child even dedicated a whole episode of the French chef to them! It's a technique that everybody has to master, or at least try to, at some point in their culinary career.

The trick: get your pan good and hot, so that the eggs get move and fluffy. And don't skimp on the butter(my own personal tip).

The one above isn't so pretty because I took a few bites before remembering to snap a picture. But it has tomatoes from my garden's final haul as well as onion, salt & pepper. You can add whatever. So they're excellent for dinner parties in which you want to class it up. You know, cuz you're a fancy bitch. Look at you. So fancy.

posted from Bloggeroid

Breakfast/Brunch/Anytime

http://foodloverbabe.tumblr.com/post/98883335959/heyrainbows-by-jelisa

If someone could just make this for me today, that would be just super. I need a kick start!

posted from Bloggeroid

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Pound cake French Toast



Leftover pound cake?

Soak 2 slices in 1 cup milk, 1 large egg, 1/2 tsp almond extract and 3 Tbsp sugar for 10 minutes to create the best French Toast ever.

Fry in butter. Slather with syrup or jam.

posted from Bloggeroid

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

A True Room 39 Post

Last time I was at Room 39, I was actually bumming their internet to finish up a few writing assignments, as well as some work stuff. This time, I'm here because they were just too gosh-darn accommodating and nice about the whole thing that I just had to come back. Their Foursquare hinted towards the Oven eggs, so I just had to give them a go. Plus, they have Harney  & Sons tea...and we all know I'm a sucker for Earl Gray.

Room 39 on UrbanspoonThe tea is served with steamed milk, which comes in a proper little stainless steel kettle. The tea cup is more of a mug, which is mismatched with the saucer, but only a really anal prick like me would ever truly notice. The tea is even served with an adorable little demitasse spoon, which is usually reserved for espresso and coffee drinks.  The tea already comes in the mug, however, with the tea bag, so you can't do the "proper English way" of scalding the milk with the hot tea, which changes the flavor...but one would argue that with steamed milk it doesn't matter. Which it kind of doesn't, really. But, hey, today you learned something about the 'proper English way of tea', didn't you? The thing that matters is that they know what they're doing.

Let's talk about the ambiance. We have "exposed brick" wall on the left, which appears to be genuine-ish, and we also have exposed vents, a historical-esque ceiling with chipping paint...and warm, European-style flooring and bistro tables and chairs. A few of the chairs are chipped on the backs or the leggs, but that only seems to add to everything. They were going for Euro-bistro, and they got it.

The entrance is a curtained-in area to brush away the bitter Kansas City cold, and lots of flyers from the local area are left there for comers or go-ers. On the walls are, what appear to be, vintage prints and paintings by a local artist, all priced accordingly. Many Westport/39th street area restaurants advertise with their local artists on consignment deals, which is mutually beneficial to both parties. (Not only do you get low-cost artwork for your walls, but you get to help the community out.

The servers I've had each time I come here are lovely pixies with black dresses, stockings, and one has tattoos. (The one with tattoos also has the most-adorable dimples I've ever seen.) They're knowledgeable, friendly, and casually well-mannered. They're relaxed; they don't hover over you, which is amazing. But they did remember me, so that's a good feeling.

The oven eggs were completely delicious, and super-filling. The fruit was fresh and melded well. The gruyere was cheesey, the salami was salty...an overall tasty dish, impressive in its simplicity. I can see how they would go well with truffle oil, but I honestly don't care for the stuff, myself. I know, I know, I should pass my Chef-card forward...but, darnit, I can't put truffle oil on eggs. Potatoes? Sure. Asparagus? Why not. Eggs? No, thanks. I'm a purist.

All in all? Not bad at all. I enjoyed the food, the wait staff was very friendly, the wifi is fast, and the atmosphere is pretty cool. I think it's the perfect 'dining alone' experience. I don't know if I'd want to come here with another person, necessarily, but I wouldn't not want to come with another person.

The place is satisfying in and of itself. It makes me feel like it could be a tiny little bistro somewhere in Marseille, or something. It's chill. And the food is good. It's a good, little bistro. So I'll be back. Maybe with another person. But I'm comfortable dining alone, here, so that will always be a good sign.

And someone should check out the Room 39 in Leawood, so I can know what it was like without taking the trek all the way down there. I mean, seriously, this is right down the street from my house.

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Ginger Sue's is AMAZING

It's very unassuming on the outside. No, really. If you didn't know what you were looking for you would probably pass it without even knowing what had happened. It's such a little door - probably to hold in all the flavors, just like Wonka's chocolate factory - and it opens to such a possibility.

You're first greeted with a warm palette of colors, warm autumnal reds with yellow, browns and golds. It's not lavish. It's meant to look like a beautiful Southwestern/Creole kitchen. In its simplicity of design, you feel like you've stumbled upon something special. A. and I were seated by a friendly brunette waitress, which seemed to be one of many. (Seriously, there were a lot of pretty little brunettes that were there that day.) The coffee was fresh, which was a good sign, and the staff was very friendly and engaging. None of that glazed-over dead-in-the-eye stuff of so many people I've seen here. It was refreshing.

The menu seemed heavily influenced by Cajun/Creole ingredients. Everything from Cajun crepes to andouille sausage pasta specials, from breakfast to lunch of tenderloin or pancakes. They had french toast and eggs benedict. I personally couldn't resist the call of the hollandaise sauce, I settled for the crab benedict, rather than the salmon benedict(which almost got me,  had I not had so much dang smoked salmon in Garde Manger class lately). Classical French meets Cajun/Creole meets America. That's a wonderful description of their cuisine, I think.

A. got the tenderloin, which was breaded very nicely and served on a rather large plate of veggie accompaniments as well as a tasty apple-peppers slaw. It was moist and thin, and didn't give that normally heavy feeling that many tenderloins sometimes give. You know, the kind where you know you've eaten too much bread and you can do nothing about it?

The crab benedict was great. The eggs were poached perfectly and the hollandaise sauce, although just a touch under-seasoned, balanced out the homefried potatoes that came with it. Good toast on the English muffin, good amount of crab vs. egg...all in all, it was a successful and creative dish. Both A. and I were stuffed when the waitress asked if we'd have pumpkin pie for dessert. I couldn't resist, but I couldn't speak - fortunately, I have the most wonderful boyfriend in the world who suggested that we split it.

Ginger Sue's on UrbanspoonAll of their pies and desserts are made in-House, which is always admirable. The crust was nice and tender, and the custard of the pumpkin pie itself was nice and spicy with that same smoothness that we all desire in a custard pie. The real trick to custard pies is low heat with a long and slow cooking time. You can tell that a lot of love went into this pie, and it showed. Ginger Sue's is easily my new favorite breakfast place in historic downtown Liberty, MO and you'll be sure to see me back there for the rest of the menu sometime soon. If you'd like to check out more of their info, go to UrbanSpoon. 90% of people who have been there love it.  No need to be shocked.